Bounce Energy Balls

Add some Bounce to your bum-bag!

More food for thought in regards to fuelling your running.  I have recently discovered Bounce Energy Balls, another healthy way to get the carbohydrate and protein for energy and repair that fell running demands.  A good source of unsaturated fat they also contain a range of vitamins and minerals.

Bounce Energy Balls

Bounce Balls come in a range of colours!

The balls come in an interesting range of protein packed flavours each in an individual wrapper.  At 42g each they provide two or three decent sized mouthfuls of tasty snack, ideal for halfway round your long run or for instant refuelling as soon as you finish.

Bounce Balls

post run recovery

I use Spirulina powder in my diet which I mix with other foods to mask its rather unpalatable smell and powdery taste, so I was particularly interested in the Spirulina & Ginseng balls hoping that they would be more tasty than they sounded!  I wasn’t disappointed as although they look unusual they taste good.

Spirulina & Ginseng Bounce

Spirulina & Ginseng – looks odd, tastes good!

Bounce Balls are also gluten free, good news for runners with wheat intolerance.  Typical nutrition information for a single 42g ball (Cashew and Pecan) is:

Energy – 180 kcal
Protein – 4g
Carbohydrate – 22g (9g sugars)
Fat – 9g (1g saturated)
Sodium – 0.095g

So if you’re looking for some wholesome, tasty snacks to fuel your running – put some Bounce Balls in your bum-bag!

put some Bounce in your bum bag!

put some Bounce in your bum bag!

Mule Fuel

Mule Bar Review

Always on the look out for products to fuel my running and recovery I recently came across Mule Bar products.  Based in the UK (which I like) they produce a range of items including energy bars, protein bars and energy gels.  Using natural, healthy ingredients the Mule Bar range is intended to provide the intended nutrition whilst tasting good.

Mule Bar range

Mule Fuel

The energy bars come in a range of seven interesting flavours such as Pinacolada, Summer Pudding and Liquorice Allsports! and include some organic and Fairtrade versions.  I found these bars tasty and looked forward to my long runs so that I had a proper excuse to try them out.  Mule Bar also do their bit for the environment by using compostable wrappers and donating 1% to the planet

For recovery they produce a high protein bar in chocolate and date or chocolate and banana flavours, both of which are pleasant tasting and are great straight after a long run or hard training session.

Mule Bar gels again come in an interesting range of flavours, two of which are standard non caffeinated plus one containing 50mg of caffeine.  Then there is the daddy: the Cafe Cortado gel with a kicking 100mg of caffeine.  This caught me out somewhat as the strong coffee flavour, thick gel and high caffeine wasn’t really what I wanted a couple of hours into a mountain run on a hot day.  However I think that it would be ideal in other situations such as during the overnight low points on 24 hour rounds such as the Bob Graham or during the wee small hours on the High Peak Marathon.  As with many gels these are best taken with a small amount of liquid to wash them down and aid digestion.

Mule Bar energy gel

interesting flavours!

So if you’re after a tasty, ethical energy product in a range of interesting natural flavours and which is made by a Britain company then give Mule Bar a try.

Nourish Me Now

Recovery is an important aspect of training for anyone taking fell running seriously.

Races, hard training sessions and long runs all require proper nutrition to aid recovery. Whilst going for a pint is a sociable way of rounding off your race there is a better strategy! It is thought that consuming a 3:1 carbohydrate to protein mix within the first half hour after exercise is the optimum way of refuelling.

There are plenty of sports drinks on the market that will allow you to do this, I have recently discovered one that is a little bit different.

Nourish Me Now drink

interesting flavours

nourish me now ingredients

high protein and carbohydrate content

Nourish Me Now is a drink made with natural ingredients and interesting flavours (the blackcurrant, white tea and vanilla is particularly nice!) Unlike some other drinks it isn’t thick and doesn’t taste too sweet and so is quite refreshing and thirst quenching.

Another thing I like about Nourish Me Now is that it is made in Sheffield by a small business with a background in sport and who really believe in their product.

So after your next hard run why not try a proper recovery drink… before you go to the pub!

Safesport id Wristband

Don’t fall down a rabbit hole!

These words have become a bit of a joke and I hear them every time I leave the house to go fell running.  But joking aside fell running can be hazardous.  If I’m heading somewhere remote I take emergency kit with me which will hopefully allow me to get myself out of trouble.  But if something more serious happened and I was found unconscious or incoherent it would be good if the rescuer knew who I was, if I had any medical problems and who to contact other than the emergency services.

So I wear a Safesport id: a small rubber wristband that is engraved with my chosen emergency details.  They come in a choice of colours and you get 4 bands of different diameters to suit a wide range of wrist sizes – even my puny wrists!

Safesport id

Safesport id wristband

They cost about £15 and make a useful gift.

So next time you venture out alone running, walking or on yer bike will you have some emergency id on you?  There’s a lot of rabbit holes out there!

Running Free Review

Running Free, a new book from the author of Feet in the Clouds.

Running Free

Richard Askwith tells of his journey through different ages of running, from his early years as a time and outcome obsessed runner pounding the tarmac to what he is today, a rural runner motivated by the pursuit of happiness.  Turning his back on the modern world of corporate branded, packaged and regimented running he expresses what running now means to him.

At times poetic and humorous he describes his running adventures both abroad and in the countryside around his Northamptonshire home with his dog Nutmeg.  Where once running was about personal bests he now takes pleasure in nature: the sight of a Buzzard or the dew soaked grass on a dawn run.

He eloquently captures the essence of that most basic of human instincts which we all felt as children: running for pleasure, running free.

 If you enjoyed Feet in the Clouds then reading Running Free is a must.

 

Baby Food for Distance Runners?

Do you use energy gels for your long distances runs and races?

I do but I tend to find them a little too sweet and sickly.  I use Science in Sport gels and like the fact that they can be taken without a drink making them easy to swallow; particularly important when racing as I don’t like chewing things when I’m breathing hard.  However, sometimes I would prefer something that gave me the energy but with a less sugary taste. Also some people find that gels have a tendency to upset their stomach – ever seen people disappearing into the bushes or diving behind a wall on a long race? Not ideal is it!

So, is there an alternative to energy gels?

One thing that I have found to work quite well is baby food!  Yes those little pouches of mushed up food that I always thought must taste disgusting.  Well a little bit of trial and error with the flavours has led me to one that is actually quite pleasant!

baby food for runners

baby food for runners!

I have tried several brands and prefer Ella’s Kitchen; I particularly like the mango, yoghurt and rice baby brekkie. The mix of fruit and yoghurt gives a tangy rather than sweet taste and the rice means that is slightly thicker than a SiS gel (which is designed to be taken without water) although they are still easy to swallow. It has no added sugar and the 100g pouch contains 112 kcal compared to 87 kcal in a 60ml gel.  They cost around £1, the same as a gel and the twist top means that you can reseal the pouch if you don’t want to swallow it all in one go.  This also prevents the remnants leaking out into your bag when you’ve finished it.

baby food for runners

baby food: 112 calories and 20g of carbohydrate

SiS gel

Gel: 87 calories and 22g of carbohydrate

I use baby food as fuel on long training runs and also on very long races such as the High Peak Marathon whilst on both the Paddy Buckley and Ramsay rounds I carried baby food pouches as an essential part of my nutrition strategy. There are other flavours and other brands, I suggest you check which has the most calories per 100g.

High Peak Marathon equipment

essentials for the High Peak Marathon include baby food pouches

I put the baby food to the test on a long run, you can see what I found in the video.  Before you go though, a quick word of warning – give the fish pie and mashed potato pouches a miss – YUK!!

 

Click the logo to see what else I do:

fell running guide

Blizzard Bags

Winter fell and trail running in remote areas can be hazardous.

Have you ever had to stop running whilst wearing only a thin base layer and waterproof top? If so you will have realised that it doesn’t take long to get cold.  Although you might not feel too cold whilst running, even in wet and windy weather, as soon as you stop exercising and thus producing heat you begin to cool down rapidly.

Descending White Side

remote running in bad weather

An enforced stop, a sprained ankle for example, can easily lead to the onset of hypothermia in such conditions.

One great piece of kit that I carry on remote runs is a Blizzard Survival Bag.  This is made of a highly thermally efficient material with a warmth to weight ratio exceeding even goose down.  What’s more it is durable and efficient even when wet.

Blizzard Bag

Blizzard Bag

The Active Range version weighs only 280 grams and is small enough to fit into a bumbag.  It comes vacuum packed for ease of transport and once opened unfolds into a full length sleeping bag.

Blizzard Survival Bag for running

lightweight and easy to carry

Blizzard Bag for runners

easily opens to sleeping bag size

It works by trapping a layer of air between two layers of thermally reflective material.  Once inside, the draw cord can be pulled tight around your head leaving a small breathing space and keeping you out of the wind and rain.  Any heat your body gives off is retained within the bag rather than being lost to the elements.

Sat in a Blizzard Bag

snug inside the bag

At a little over £20 Blizzard Bags are a really good investment.  It’s the first thing that goes into my bag when I’m off running or walking in remote areas.

Next time you’re out on a remote run think about what would happen if you or one of your group had to stop for a length of time.  What state would you be in by the time help arrived?  This bag might be the difference between an uncomfortable wait and something much more serious.

So get out there, run and enjoy the worst that the winter can throw at us, but stay safe.

 

Running on Ice

Icy conditions have made fell running training a little difficult recently.

Although deep snow is difficult to run through it is actually great for training.  You have to work harder as the snow provides resistance to your forwards movement, you have to lift your knees higher and so bring into play muscles that you don’t normally use and if you do fall over (which is inevitable) you usually end up with a soft landing.

The problems start when conditions underfoot are icy such as when the snow melts during the day then refreezes at night or where it gets compressed into a hard, frozen layer.  I have been asked by several people recently how I continue training when it gets icy.

One way is to use Micro-spikes.  I use Kahtoola. These are basically scaled down walking crampons that simply attach to your shoe and are held in place by stretchy rubber. They can be put on in around 10 seconds per foot and taken off in a fraction of that.  Reasonably small and light I simply carry them in my bum bag or rucksack and put them on when needed.

I find them a really great piece of kit which allow me to keep training on terrain that might otherwise be too difficult to run on.

The video shows you how easy they are to use:

To book a Peak District guided run, coaching or navigation training session visit:

logo www coaching