1000 Mile Trail Socks – Review

Who doesn’t enjoy the feeling of putting on a new pair of socks?

Ones that hug you and feel soft beneath your feet rather than those mis-shapen, threadbare and holy things that you seem to have been running in recently! 1000 Mile Trail Socks are my new socks; a blend of acrylic and Merino wool that are anatomically shaped offering different amounts of padding to different parts of the foot.

photo of 1000 Mile trail socks

1000 Mile trail socks

The forefoot, heel and toes have more padding for comfort and this extends up the achilles to reduce friction and offer more protection. The top of the foot and under the arch has a thinner construction allowing more ventilation and the elasticated top hugs the calf, without being too tight, and prevents the socks from riding down.

photo of 1000 Mile Trail Sock

padded achilles and elasticated top

I found the socks comfortable and soft and I liked the fact that I couldn’t feel the toe seam meaning there would be no friction issues on long runs. They are quick drying and the Merino wool helps keep your feet warm when wet whilst its antibacterial properties means that they are likely keep your feet fresher that purely synthetic socks, especially when damp or sweaty.

1000 mile trail socks

different padding for different parts

Comfortable and affordable the 1000 Mile trail socks are ideal for cooler months when you might want a slightly thicker sock and for runs where you don’t mind having wet feet.

RRP £12 (twin pack)

More info about 1000 mile socks here: https://1000mile.co.uk/

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Rooster Sailing Neoprene Sock Review

Fell running in winter results in wet feet, there’s no avoiding it!

Over the years I’ve tried different brands of so called “waterproof” socks but found that after a couple of outings they cease to be waterproof, water that does get in stays in and you end up with a heavy, soggy sock. Yes your feet stay relatively warm but they certainly don’t stay dry. Also, waterproof socks are expensive so when I threw my last pair away I wanted to replace them with something cheaper that would keep my feet warm if not dry.

running through puddles

winter running means wet feet! (photo Fell Running Guide)

Someone recommended Rooster Sailing neoprene socks as a cheaper alternative to waterproof socks so I thought I’d give them a try. (I got the 3mm neoprene Superstretch Wet Socks) As the name suggests, these socks are designed for sailing rather than running and my first thought on seeing them was that the stitched seam that runs under the heel would be uncomfortable. However I needn’t have worried as it was much less noticeable than I feared. The extra thickness of the 3mm neoprene means that your shoes will feel tighter than normal and so you might struggle if your shoes are already a tight fit. The stretch of the material makes the socks easy to get on and off and the top extends to the lower calf and gives a snug fit.

Rooster Sailing sock

3mm stretchy neoprene

On short runs I was pleased to find that my feet were warm and damp at the end but the real test would come on longer runs in very cold conditions. Luckily the Trigger fell race provided an excellent testing ground; 24 miles across high moorland with melting snow!

runners crossing river

ideal testing conditions! (photo Mossienet)

After four and a half hours with wet feet from the numerous river crossings I was very happy that I could still feel my feet! Other runners were complaining that their feet felt like blocks of wood, mine were fine. Since then I’ve used the socks for long runs in bad weather and always found that my feet end up warm and damp rather than cold and wet.

The Verdict

The Roosters aren’t the cheapest of neoprene socks, (a pair will set you back about £20) but they feel robust and well made and they are still significantly cheaper than a well known brand of waterproof socks. The super stretch material fits the shape of your foot without any baggy areas and so gives a comfortable fit.  It is worth keeping your big toenails trimmed to avoid wearing a hole in the socks – which I seem to have done with previous waterproof socks – although unlike waterproof socks a hole in the toe won’t compromise the effectiveness of the sock.

runner crossing stream

another wet run! (photo Fell Running Guide)

I can certainly recommend Rooster Sailing Neoprene Wet Socks, I’ve worn them in some pretty harsh conditions this winter and I haven’t had cold feet!

runner in snow

cold weather, warm feet (photo M. Scotney)

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Injinji – Gloves for your Feet

The great thing about fell running is its simplicity.

No expensive kit is needed, there’s no need to keep updating to the latest design, it’s just a case of get dressed and go.  So there’s nothing much to consider when it comes to choosing a pair of socks, right?

Well that’s what I thought until I went to a talk by experienced Ultra Running athletes, sharing their knowledge with runners hoping to complete the Mammut Ultra Tour of the Peak District.  The fact is that during an ultra distance race your body has enough to deal with and so avoiding anything that could slow you down is crucial, things like blisters for example.

An ill fitting sock might not cause you too much trouble on a short run or race but what if you’re on the go for 10 hours or more?  That little ruck in your sock, that little bit of skin rubbing on skin is going to cause a problem.  That’s where Injinji toe socks come in.

Injinji toe socks

Injinji toe socks

What are they?

Injinjis are designed as left and right foot specific socks with each toe having its own little bit of sock – just like gloves but on your feet!  The anatomical shaping helps keep the toes correctly aligned and prevents them rubbing on each other.  Sweat is also removed from the toes and thus the chance of getting blisters is reduced.  The material is a mix of Coolmax, Nylon and Lycra giving a snug fit with increased reinforcement at the heel and toes where most of the wear is likely to occur.

What are they like to wear?

My first thought on seeing them was “they look odd!”  Having had thousands of pairs of socks I have got used to what they look like – and these look different, but that’s no reason not to wear them.  The main thing you notice is when putting them on.  After decades of putting socks on without thinking you have to actually concentrate on what you’re doing and line up each toe with its own compartment.  This was a little bit fiddly and certainly not something that you could do in the dark whilst still half asleep!

Injinji toe socks

Strange but comfortable

Having got them on they felt a little unusual around the toes although I soon got used to this.  I first tested them out with my usual fell shoes on a hard hill rep session in the Peak District.  My concern was that as there was more material in the toe box they might make the shoe too tight, but this wasn’t a problem and once my shoes were on I felt just as comfy as usual.  The run had me on my toes on the way up whilst the steep downhill sections was the sort of terrain that forces your feet to the front of your shoes.  The Injinjis were comfortable and supportive (although they didn’t make the hills any easier!)

Overall I liked the Injinji toe socks and will be using them for long days out fell and trail running in the Peak District where the real test will come – but it will take more than gloved feet to turn me into an Ultra runner!